New ISO launches, CTMs urged to incorporate fresh travel policy standards

TRM requires that organisations anticipate and assess the potential for events, develop treatments and communicate anticipated risk exposures to their travellers

The new ISO 31030:2021 travel risk management (TRM) guidance for organisations, which was published in September, is being touted as the first truly global standard checklist for corporate travel.

TRM specialists, speaking at last week’s CTC (Corporate Travel Community) Masterclass ISO Standard: 31030 – TRM, urged corporates preparing for the return of business travel to implement the new standards for duty of care among all stakeholders.

TRM requires that organisations anticipate and assess the potential for events, develop treatments and communicate anticipated risk exposures to their travellers

Bob Quick, executive director and founder, Global Secure Accreditation, commented organisations should integrate TRM activities with their respective teams and stakeholders would include risk management, security, human resources, occupational health, legal, procurement, IT, TMCs and their supply chains.

Todd Handcock, president, Asia-Pacific, Collinson Group, said it was critical for businesses to prepare as 3Q vs 2Q survey results showed corporate travel managers (CTM) were more pessimistic about how soon pre-pandemic travel levels would return.

Handcock advised CTMs to take a “holistic approach” and steps taken should include pre-trip risk assessment, vaccinations, providing physical and mental support and gathering post-trip feedback for future trip planning.

Also important, he added, was effective communication, as he noted that 51 per cent of travellers before the pandemic did not know what TRM support from the company was available during a trip.

Agreeing that safety and security support are top priorities, Quick observed: “There is rising anxiety among leisure and business travellers. Confidence (to travel) is now more important than ever.”

To help raise confidence, Quick said all suppliers to be accredited should satisfy ISO 31030 guidance as the “baseline”, while Handcock pointed out that a TRM system had to provide “evidence-based solutions”.

Do not substitute “assumption for assessment” in a world that is increasingly unpredictable, Quick quipped.

Benson Tang, executive director, CTC who moderated the discussion, said a global TRM standard was long overdue, and analysing travel risk threats was “massive, complex and challenging”.

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